History

dog working sheepAustralia’s grazier lifestyle today and in the past has always depended on the help of dogs. Three unique and distinct breeds of dogs have emerged from the sheep and cattle stations of Australia: the Australian Cattle Dog, the Australian Kelpie and the German Coolie. The original dogs arrived with immigrants in the late 1700’s and early 1800’s with most of these people being from England and Germany. The three Australian herding breeds emerged as graziers and farmers selectively bred for traits that suited their needs. The German Coolie was probably in reference to the German immigrants and the dogs they brought with them. It is possible it was a slang word for collie (referring to the German’s Collie), or even a derogatory name for the dogs meaning they were less than purebred. No one really knows the exact origin. This registry chooses to stick with the more historic name of German Coolie. There are more contemporary groups who have recently started calling the dogs Australian Coolies or even Koolies. They are all dogs of the same history and origin.

There are written accoworking sheepunts of people referring to the importation of a German spotted dog called a Tiger dog which had “silver” and was multi colored, much like many of the German Coolies found today. It is likely that the immigrants who arrived to Australia as early as the 1780’s from Germany also brought these Tiger dogs with them. The Coolie was noted very early on for sometimes being merle and with blue eyes. Later in the 1850s smooth and rough coated collies would be imported from Scotland and England including the silver collie, which was also merled. This merle gene would be present in the German Coolies, a ticking gene would be present in the Australian Cattle Dog, and solid or bi colors would become standard in kelpies once these breeds began to be bred for specific jobs. The Coolie would continue to be bred for versatility and all around station dogs with fewer specialties in mind than were bred for in the Australian Cattle Dog with its heeling and bite characteristics on cattle and the Kelpie for its casting and sheep yard abilities such as backing. The Coolie continues to be a versatile and intelligent dog that is very biddable and able to do any job presented to it with or without livestock

Nash GDAToday they continue to work on Australian stations herding and backing but they are also present in agility rings, in dock diving, in flyball and Frisbee, as search and rescue dogs and as companion dogs. Their presence in countries outside of Australia is becoming more common, especially in Canada and the United States.

 

 


Australian Koolie/Coolie – German Koolie/Coolie – Coulie – German Collie